Teaching Crime and Punishment

I am sure you all know of the excellent websites out there to help you, but I would particularly recommend the Durham University Library, The British Library, and the National Archives . The Learning Curve section of the National Archives site is probably well-known to you all, but if you are new to teaching a Crime and Punishment course then you need to know that the resources here are really worth a visit. As you can see from the graphic in the image gallery to the right, by clicking on the link, the materials are organised around 3 themes (crime, prevention, and punishment) and four periods (pre-1450, 1450-1750, 1750-1900, and the 20th century). I particularly like the way that key questions have been used to give the choice of documents and related questions a real coherence.

A great resource for teaching Victorian crime and punishment is available at http://www.ictopus.org.uk It shows how to use a searchable database of over 4,000 records on inmates at a Scottish jail in the period 1820-1888.  All the groundwork has been done so why not read the report above and see if it could be used alongside other databases about transportation etc.

The companion site to Dan Moorhouse’s Medicine through Time is this new site on Crime and Punishment.  This site is being developed to provide links to the best teaching and revision materials available for the SHP study of Crime and Punishment through time. Initially this will consist of linking to materials elsewhere, with regular updates and additions. In time it is planned to develop pupil guides to the key elements of the course and interactive materials to support teaching and learning.

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