Were medieval crimes and punishments as brutal as people think? Two smart tasks

First students work collaboratively to distil from 16 pieces of evidence provided, the ones they think give them the most significant information they need to work into a 6 sentence summary of the arguments. In the second task students again work in teams to sort out most to least plausible answers to two puzzles on later medieval justice.

Introduce the question using slide 2. Then show slide 3 which makes it seem fairly clear cut. But is it? Ask students to work in groups of three to visit the 16 pieces of evidence. Each will be more or less important in helping them to answer the question. Their job is to find the significant telling arguments and then synthesise them into just 6 sentences of no more than 12 words each.

When they have done this, you may want to go over some of the key points that you, yourself, would have made.

To help with differentiation you might want to offer some groups fewer sources or to ask them to tackle the sources in a particular order. If you are placing the evidence in a dossier, one per group, ask some students to turn over the sheets with the

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