Teaching Florence Nightingale and Mary Seacole at KS1

Teaching Florence Nightingale at KS1

Although many Year 2 teachers feel that they would like a break from teaching Florence Nightingale in history at KS1, they cannot deny that she does indisputably provide an excellent context for the development of a variety of important skills and concepts in history. Pupils learn about sequence, duration and consequences. They can appreciate that there are different interpretations of Florence Nightingale and can, through role play, appreciate the different attitudes people had towards her in the past.

There are a wide range of lessons here to feed the wide demand and a downloadable planner in the medium term planning section. The one of the different stages of Florence’s life provides an excellent context for numeracy, so that children see the relative lengths of time Florence spent doing different things in her life.

Comparisons with Mary Seacole offer an excellent context for discussion of the theme of fairness, and pupils can be really creative in their work on how the contribution of the two women should be commemorated.

What did people really think of Florence Nightingale?

This lesson was taught by Judith Holmes, of Awbridge Primary School, Hampshire.  Judith has supplied QCA with a number of her high quality lessons and planning.  They can be found in the 'History Matters/ It worked for me' part of the site.   In this...

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Teaching Mary Seacole to Key Stage 1

Mary Seacole's inclusion might be regarded by some as tokenism. That would be unfair. The site also features work on Rosa Parks and others. The reason Mary is included is mainly because it helps children to understand that there are different interpretations of the past...
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Mary Seacole: How should we remember her?

This lesson is the second featuring Mary Seacole.  In the first her role was compared with Florence Nightingale's. The focus now shifts to asking two key questions: which was Mary Seacole's greatest achievement ; why is she not remembered as well as Florence?

Learning objectives

  • children can...
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Florence Nightingale and Mary Seacole SMART TASK

Who said it? / Who am I?

This simple task encourages children to spot the differences between Florence Nightingale and Mary Seacole.

With a large A4 image of Florence on one side, and Mary Seacole on the other, you sit with a pack of cards which...
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