New content for History GCSE from 2015

We now have some more definitive detail of the content of the new history GCSEs. It will take a while to work out the full implications but here is the DFE’s summary, in their words for you to deliberate on.

GCSE specifications in history should require students to study:
 a substantial and coherent element of British history and/or the history of England,
Scotland, Wales or Ireland (minimum 40%).
This must include at least one depth
study chosen from the Medieval (500-1500), Early Modern (1450-1750) or Modern
(1700-present day) periods.
A depth study must require the investigation of
different aspects of an historical situation across a period of between 25 and 50
years
. The British element may also include a study of the historic environment
(e.g. studies of local sites, museums or galleries) related to a chosen depth study
 a substantial and coherent element of the study of the history of the wider world
(minimum 25%). This must include at least one depth study chosen from the
Medieval (500-1500), Early Modern (1450-1750) or Modern (1700-present day)
periods. This must cover a period of between 25 and 50 years and might focus on
different aspects of the history of one nation or group or on international relations
between several nations.
British and wider world depth studies may not be taken from the same period of history or
from any overlapping fifty-year period.
 one comparative or thematic study to demonstrate an understanding of change
and continuity (minimum 25%). This must involve the study of people, events and
developments drawn from all three of the Medieval (500-1500), Early Modern
(1450-1750) and Modern (1700-present day) periods
. These studies, whether
comparative or thematic, should take either a political, military, cultural, economic,
social or religious theme.
While some overlap is likely, the comparative or thematic study must differ significantly in
focus from the people, issues and events covered in the selected depth studies

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